News and events

The newsletter was a bi-annual summary of Rediscovering the Deep Human Past Laureate Project activities in 2018-2019, prior to the establishment of the Research Centre for Deep History and the Re. website.

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  • Free Event: Two ways of walking together, Science and Culture - A community based Aboriginal rock art project in the Blue Mountains

    3rd August, 2022

    The First Nations Speaker Series is presented in collaboration with Sydney Living Museums, GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. Join us for a conversation with Wayne Brennan about a community based Aboriginal rock art project.
  • Catch up: Advancing Aboriginal Led Approaches to Enterprise and Economic Development in NSW

    22nd July, 2022

    Professor Heidi Norman recently gave a talk on Aboriginal led approaches to enterprise and economic development as part of the First Nation’s Speaker Series. This series of conversations is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. This talk is now available to watch on demand via the link below. About her talk and her work, Heidi Norman has said: “In this work I offer some initial insights, drawing on field work conducted over the last few years, about Aboriginal led approaches to enterprise and economic development. Focusing on NSW and the work of Local Aboriginal Land Councils (LALCs), I map these approaches and identify some key themes along with the limits and possibilities of Aboriginal-led collective enterprise and economic development. I examine this point in relation to the history of Aboriginal contact and engagement with the settler economy, the public policy orientation towards economic development and more recently, Indigenous businesses. Bringing together the policy and the practice of communal and land-based enterprise, I offer suggestions for strategies to advance Aboriginal aspirations for economic development linked to the land estate.” [Watch Heidi’s talk on YouTube.](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfZ81N8fXDo) **About Heidi Norman** Professor Heidi Norman is a leading Australian researcher in the field of Aboriginal political history. From 2018 she has commenced a large ARC funded study of the social, economic and cultural benefits of Aboriginal land repossession in New South Wales. At the heart of her research, is her support for Aboriginal peoples’ rightful place in the nation, especially within political institutions, in society and the economy as landholders. She is a descendant of the Gomeroi people from north western NSW. Heidi Norman is a collaborating scholar of the Research Centre for Deep History.
  • Advancing Aboriginal Led Approaches to Enterprise and Economic Development in NSW

    6th July, 2022

    The First Nations Speaker Series is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. Join us for a conversation with Professor Heidi Norman about Aboriginal led approaches to enterprise and economic development. What: Advancing Aboriginal Led Approaches to Enterprise and Economic Development in NSW with Professor Heidi Norman When: Wednesday 6 July 2022, 6pm–7pm Where: Free Online and in person at the Museum of Sydney. The session will be recorded and made available after the event. Register: Bookings are required, register for your free ticket here. About her talk and work, Heidi Norman has said: “In this work I offer some initial insights, drawing on field work conducted over the last few years, about Aboriginal led approaches to enterprise and economic development. Focusing on NSW and the work of Local Aboriginal Land Councils (LALCs), I map these approaches and identify some key themes along with the limits and possibilities of Aboriginal-led collective enterprise and economic development. I examine this point in relation to the history of Aboriginal contact and engagement with the settler economy, the public policy orientation towards economic development and more recently, Indigenous businesses. Bringing together the policy and the practice of communal and land-based enterprise, I offer suggestions for strategies to advance Aboriginal aspirations for economic development linked to the land estate.” ![Heidi-Norman-1.png](http://localhost:1337/uploads/Heidi_Norman_1_8a0aef8c23.png) ###### Heidi Norman **About Heidi Norman** Professor Heidi Norman is a leading Australian researcher in the field of Aboriginal political history. From 2018 she has commenced a large ARC funded study of the social, economic and cultural benefits of Aboriginal land repossession in New South Wales. At the heart of her research, is her support for Aboriginal peoples’ rightful place in the nation, especially within political institutions, in society and the economy as landholders. She is a descendant of the Gomeroi people from north western NSW.
  • Catch up: First Nations Speaker Series: In conversation with Dennis Golding

    16th June, 2022

    The First Nations Speaker Series is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. In this session artist Dennis Golding and Sydney Living Museums’ Head of First Nations Cultural Engagement Peter White discussed Golding’s series of work Cast in cast out.
  • Catch up on Deep Conversations: Restoration, Recovery and Repair, Part II: Rehabilitation

    2nd June, 2022

    Deep Conversations: History, Environment, Science is a partnership of the Research Centre for Deep History and Centre for Environmental History. The seminar series aims to bring together scholars from diverse disciplines to discuss questions of history, science and the environment, and how they shed light on the global challenges we face today. Amid a climate of crisis and ‘unprecedented times’, moments of destruction and devastation are intertwined with those of respite and renewal. By exploring these moments—their mechanisms and tensions—scholars can produce new insights into our past, present and potential futures. In Part II of this deep conversation, [Dr Annick Thomassin](https://caepr.cass.anu.edu.au/people/dr-annick-thomassin), [Dr Nicholas Hoare](https://history.cass.anu.edu.au/people/nicholas-hoare), and [Dr Scott McKinnon](https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/scott_mckinnon) reflected on the practice, meaning and significance of rehabilitation, and its significance for communities, histories, institutions, and ecologies. Catch up here: [https://youtu.be/ho5YIxtvDDA](https://youtu.be/ho5YIxtvDDA)
  • Deep Conversations: Restoration, Recovery and Repair, Part II: Rehabilitation

    23rd May, 2022

    Amid a climate of crisis and ‘unprecedented times’, moments of destruction and devastation are intertwined with those of respite and renewal. By exploring these moments—their mechanisms and tensions—scholars can produce new insights into our past, present and potential futures. In Part II of this deep conversation, join Dr Annick Thomassin, Dr Nicholas Hoare, and Dr Scott McKinnon as they reflect on the practice, meaning and significance of rehabilitation, and its significance for communities, histories, institutions, and ecologies. Date: Monday 23 May 2022 Time: 12:00-1:30pm Location: Room 2.52, Level 2, RSSS Building, 146 Ellery Crescent, ANU Register: This is a free event, but bookings are essential. [Register to attend here](https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/deep-conversations-restoration-recovery-repair-tickets-331743613077). Speakers: - [Dr Annick Thomassin]([https://caepr.cass.anu.edu.au/people/dr-annick-thomassin), Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, ANU - [Dr Nicholas Hoare](https://history.cass.anu.edu.au/people/nicholas-hoare), Pacific History Research Fellow at the Department of Pacific Affairs, College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University - [Dr Scott McKinnon](https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/scott_mckinnon), PERL Research Fellow in the Australian Centre for Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS), School of Geography and Sustainable Communities, University of Wollongong Deep Conversations: History, Environment, Science is a partnership of the Research Centre for Deep History and Centre for Environmental History. The seminar series aims to bring together scholars from diverse disciplines to discuss questions of history, science and the environment, and how they shed light on the global challenges we face today.
  • An introduction to new team member Amy Way

    23rd May, 2022

    The Research Centre for Deep History was pleased to welcome Postdoctoral Research Associate Dr. Amy Way in February this year. Amy specialises in the history of human antiquity and deep time in Australia, and its conceptualisation within geology, archaeology, anthropology and public discourse. She received the Vice Chancellor’s Commendation for Academic Excellence for her PhD dissertation (2020), and in 2021, was awarded the Australian Historical Association’s Ann Curthoys Prize for her study of Aboriginal antiquity in Australian anthropology. **RCDH: What drew you to the Centre for Deep History?** Amy: I have always been fascinated by Australian history, and especially the narratives settler-Australians choose to tell themselves about the past. The Centre for Deep History shares my concern with deepening historical narratives, questioning traditional periodisation, transforming the scale of history, and bridging the gap between the deep past and the present. But what really drew me to the Centre is not just how the team use their research to reshape how we think about history, but how their work platforms, and is led by, Indigenous voices. Deep history in Australia goes beyond settler epistemology to be first and foremost an embodied, living history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander’s enduring connection to Country. **RCDH: What will you be working on?** A: I’ll be working on turning my doctoral research into a book, while also helping the team finish the Centre’s digital deep history atlas. I’ll be conducting fieldwork on Country, collecting oral histories, and searching through collections for artefacts that help communicate deep history beyond the colonial archive. I am also running training workshops, and co-convening the Deep Conversations: History, Science, Environment seminar series with colleagues in the Centre for Environmental History. **RCDH: What were you doing before you came to Re?** A: Before I moved to Canberra, I lived in Sydney and taught Australian history at Macquarie University and the University of Notre Dame (Ultimo). I also worked as an Education Officer for Macquarie University’s fantastic history incursions program, Studying the Past, which delivered ancient and modern history workshops to high school students. Outside of teaching, I was (and still am) working on a biography of paleontologist and museum director Robert Etheridge Junior (1846-1920), in partnership with the Australian Museum and Etheridge descendants. Amy’s work has been published in History Australia and Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science. She is a Visiting Fellow with the New Earth Histories Research Centre at the University of New South Wales, Sydney. Follow Amy on twitter: [@amywayness](https://twitter.com/amywayness)
  • Deep Conversations: Restoration, Recovery and Repair, Part II: Rehabilitation

    23rd May, 2022

    Amid a climate of crisis and ‘unprecedented times’, moments of destruction and devastation are intertwined with those of respite and renewal. By exploring these moments—their mechanisms and tensions—scholars can produce new insights into our past, present and potential futures. In Part II of this deep conversation, join Dr Annick Thomassin, Dr Nicholas Hoare, and Dr Scott McKinnon as they reflect on the practice, meaning and significance of rehabilitation, and its significance for communities, histories, institutions, and ecologies. Date: Monday 23 May 2022 Time: 12:00-1:30pm Location: Room 2.52, Level 2, RSSS Building, 146 Ellery Crescent, ANU Register: This is a free event, but bookings are essential. [Register to attend here](https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/deep-conversations-restoration-recovery-repair-tickets-331743613077). Speakers: - [Dr Annick Thomassin]([https://caepr.cass.anu.edu.au/people/dr-annick-thomassin), Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, ANU - [Dr Nicholas Hoare](https://history.cass.anu.edu.au/people/nicholas-hoare), Pacific History Research Fellow at the Department of Pacific Affairs, College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University - [Dr Scott McKinnon](https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/scott_mckinnon), PERL Research Fellow in the Australian Centre for Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS), School of Geography and Sustainable Communities, University of Wollongong Deep Conversations: History, Environment, Science is a partnership of the Research Centre for Deep History and Centre for Environmental History. The seminar series aims to bring together scholars from diverse disciplines to discuss questions of history, science and the environment, and how they shed light on the global challenges we face today.
  • First Nations Speaker Series: In conversation with Dennis Golding

    11th May, 2022

    The First Nations Speaker Series is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. In this session artist Dennis Golding and Sydney Living Museums’ Head of First Nations Cultural Engagement Peter White discuss Golding’s series of work Cast in cast out. Works from the series acquired by Sydney Living Museums were recently exhibited at the Museum of Sydney in the [exhibition Collected](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/exhibitions/collected-sydney-living-museums-acquisitions). [Cast in cast out](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/stories/dennis-golding-cast-in-cast-out) explores dispossession and colonial occupation and is inspired by Golding’s childhood on The Block, Redfern. When: Wednesday 1 June 2022, 6pm–7pm Where: In person at the The Mint, 10 Macquarie Street, Sydney, NSW, 2000 and online. Register: Bookings are required, [register for your free ticket here](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/events/first-nations-speaker-series-conversation-dennis-golding). About the speakers: ![Dennis_Golding_Headdshot.jpg](/uploads/Dennis_Golding_Headdshot_002baf6571.jpg) Dennis Golding is a Kamilaroi/ Gamilaraay artist from the north west of NSW and was born and raised in Sydney. Working in a range of mixed media including painting, video, photography and installation, Golding critiques the social, political and cultural representations of race and identity. Through his artistic and curatorial practice, Golding aims to present powerful representations of contemporary Aboriginal cultural identity that inform narratives of history and lived experiences. Read more. ![PEO16_0066.jpg](/uploads/PEO_16_0066_7d6e8c313e.jpg) Peter White’s role as Head of First Nations Cultural Engagement at Sydney Living Museums is more than just a job. It’s an opportunity for transformation. Peter is a proud Gamilaroi Murri, and his life’s work has been dedicated to championing he inherent rights of First Peoples communities in managing and practising their own culture and enhancing their cultural, social and economic wellbeing through cultural access, engagement and expression. Read more.
  • Catch up: Yarning & Art - Cultural Wellness and Caring for Mob in the Museum

    10th May, 2022

    Dr Virginia Keft recently gave a talk on cultural wellness and caring for Mob in the Museum as part of the First Nation’s Speaker Series. This series of conversations is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. Catch up on this conversation via the link below. Dementia is nationally recognised as one of the largest growing health concerns across the population in Australia. Research has shown that dementia prevalence amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is almost five times higher than that of the general population. Dr Virginia Keft identifies a major gap in the availability of services that provide culturally appropriate and informed creative and social programs to better engage and support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia and their families. Specifically, she discusses the significant role that art and art making may play in supporting positive connections of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to culture, Country, kinship, knowledge systems and beliefs. Art Yarns: For Older and Elder Mob, is a culturally responsive contemporary art program established by Dr Keft and delivered through the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia. The initiative is entirely Aboriginal designed, implemented, and delivered. Art Yarns proposes to provide positive art experiences for older people in an informal shared social environment. The program fosters the notion that intergenerational exchange is integral to bolstering strong connections to cultural identity. The program hopes to contribute to filling the considerable gap in current well-being services available to those living with dementia in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander urban Community. **About Dr Virginia Keft** Dr Virginia Keft is a proud Muruwari Woman; First Nations Producer, a practicing artist, curator, and award-winning researcher with over 25 years’ experience working in the Arts Sector. Virginia has produced and curated artistic and cultural programs that celebrate and recognise the continuity of Culture and the important contribution that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have made, and continue to make, to the Arts, education, community, and care of Country. [More on YouTube.](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXo0mkukEa0 )

We acknowledge and celebrate the First Australians on whose traditional lands we meet, and pay our respect to the elders past, present, and emerging.


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