News and events

The newsletter was a bi-annual summary of Rediscovering the Deep Human Past Laureate Project activities in 2018-2019, prior to the establishment of the Research Centre for Deep History and the Re. website.

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  • Deep Conversations: Restoration, Recovery and Repair, Part II: Rehabilitation

    23rd May, 2022

    Amid a climate of crisis and ‘unprecedented times’, moments of destruction and devastation are intertwined with those of respite and renewal. By exploring these moments—their mechanisms and tensions—scholars can produce new insights into our past, present and potential futures. In Part II of this deep conversation, join Dr Annick Thomassin, Dr Nicholas Hoare, and Dr Scott McKinnon as they reflect on the practice, meaning and significance of rehabilitation, and its significance for communities, histories, institutions, and ecologies. Date: Monday 23 May 2022 Time: 12:00-1:30pm Location: Room 2.52, Level 2, RSSS Building, 146 Ellery Crescent, ANU Register: This is a free event, but bookings are essential. [Register to attend here](https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/deep-conversations-restoration-recovery-repair-tickets-331743613077). Speakers: - [Dr Annick Thomassin]([https://caepr.cass.anu.edu.au/people/dr-annick-thomassin), Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, ANU - [Dr Nicholas Hoare](https://history.cass.anu.edu.au/people/nicholas-hoare), Pacific History Research Fellow at the Department of Pacific Affairs, College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University - [Dr Scott McKinnon](https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/scott_mckinnon), PERL Research Fellow in the Australian Centre for Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS), School of Geography and Sustainable Communities, University of Wollongong Deep Conversations: History, Environment, Science is a partnership of the Research Centre for Deep History and Centre for Environmental History. The seminar series aims to bring together scholars from diverse disciplines to discuss questions of history, science and the environment, and how they shed light on the global challenges we face today.
  • First Nations Speaker Series: In conversation with Dennis Golding

    11th May, 2022

    The First Nations Speaker Series is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. In this session artist Dennis Golding and Sydney Living Museums’ Head of First Nations Cultural Engagement Peter White discuss Golding’s series of work Cast in cast out. Works from the series acquired by Sydney Living Museums were recently exhibited at the Museum of Sydney in the [exhibition Collected](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/exhibitions/collected-sydney-living-museums-acquisitions). [Cast in cast out](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/stories/dennis-golding-cast-in-cast-out) explores dispossession and colonial occupation and is inspired by Golding’s childhood on The Block, Redfern. When: Wednesday 1 June 2022, 6pm–7pm Where: In person at the The Mint, 10 Macquarie Street, Sydney, NSW, 2000 and online. Register: Bookings are required, [register for your free ticket here](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/events/first-nations-speaker-series-conversation-dennis-golding). About the speakers: ![Dennis_Golding_Headdshot.jpg](/uploads/Dennis_Golding_Headdshot_002baf6571.jpg) Dennis Golding is a Kamilaroi/ Gamilaraay artist from the north west of NSW and was born and raised in Sydney. Working in a range of mixed media including painting, video, photography and installation, Golding critiques the social, political and cultural representations of race and identity. Through his artistic and curatorial practice, Golding aims to present powerful representations of contemporary Aboriginal cultural identity that inform narratives of history and lived experiences. Read more. ![PEO16_0066.jpg](/uploads/PEO_16_0066_7d6e8c313e.jpg) Peter White’s role as Head of First Nations Cultural Engagement at Sydney Living Museums is more than just a job. It’s an opportunity for transformation. Peter is a proud Gamilaroi Murri, and his life’s work has been dedicated to championing he inherent rights of First Peoples communities in managing and practising their own culture and enhancing their cultural, social and economic wellbeing through cultural access, engagement and expression. Read more.
  • Catch up: Yarning & Art - Cultural Wellness and Caring for Mob in the Museum

    10th May, 2022

    Dr Virginia Keft recently gave a talk on cultural wellness and caring for Mob in the Museum as part of the First Nation’s Speaker Series. This series of conversations is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. Catch up on this conversation via the link below. Dementia is nationally recognised as one of the largest growing health concerns across the population in Australia. Research has shown that dementia prevalence amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is almost five times higher than that of the general population. Dr Virginia Keft identifies a major gap in the availability of services that provide culturally appropriate and informed creative and social programs to better engage and support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia and their families. Specifically, she discusses the significant role that art and art making may play in supporting positive connections of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to culture, Country, kinship, knowledge systems and beliefs. Art Yarns: For Older and Elder Mob, is a culturally responsive contemporary art program established by Dr Keft and delivered through the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia. The initiative is entirely Aboriginal designed, implemented, and delivered. Art Yarns proposes to provide positive art experiences for older people in an informal shared social environment. The program fosters the notion that intergenerational exchange is integral to bolstering strong connections to cultural identity. The program hopes to contribute to filling the considerable gap in current well-being services available to those living with dementia in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander urban Community. **About Dr Virginia Keft** Dr Virginia Keft is a proud Muruwari Woman; First Nations Producer, a practicing artist, curator, and award-winning researcher with over 25 years’ experience working in the Arts Sector. Virginia has produced and curated artistic and cultural programs that celebrate and recognise the continuity of Culture and the important contribution that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have made, and continue to make, to the Arts, education, community, and care of Country. [More on YouTube.](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXo0mkukEa0 )
  • Deep Conversations: Restoration, Recovery and Repair, Part I: Repatriation

    6th May, 2022

    What is repatriation and how is it conceived differently by communities, governments and research institutions? To what extent is it necessary for reconciliation? Can museums and universities engage effectively and empathetically in repatriation? How can this process involve community and community building? These were some of the questions discussed in a recent Deep Conversations seminar, hosted by the ANU Research Centre for Deep History and the Centre for Environmental History, and convened by Dr Amy Way and Dr Rohan Howitt. Dr Hilary Howes began by reflecting on assumptions she made about repatriation before working as Executive Assistant to the Ambassador at the Australian Embassy in Berlin. In this role, Hilary was responsible for bilateral research collaboration and the repatriation of Australian Indigenous ancestral remains from German collecting institutions. In many cases, she that most general assumptions frequently misrepresent and misunderstand the repatriation process. One assumption is that the provenance of an item is the most important detail for both researchers and traditional owners. Many of the Indigenous communities Hilary worked with, however, were more concerned with what had happened to stolen items in the time they’d been off Country. Where had they been held? How had they been stored? Had they ever been displayed? Who had handled them? When dealing with ancestral remains, such concerns are magnified. For traditional owners, ‘ancestral remains’ are people with whom there is an existing and ongoing relationship; ancestors, or ‘old people,’ who are known and respected in the present. Another assumption is that traditional owners will feel happiness and gratitude when stolen items are returned. Hilary described the emotional reality as much more complicated. While at the Australian Embassy in Berlin, Hilary witnessed distraught traditional owners who wept when reunited with their ancestors, while others expressed anger and pain in powerful speeches criticising the governments and institutions responsible. Many traditional owners, Hilary reminded us, were still attempting to grapple with the knowledge that their ancestors had been dug up and stolen in the first place. Handover ceremonies are therefore complex sites of hope and frustration, pain and healing, that rarely represent the end of the repatriation process. Instead, traditional owners are frequently confronted by a range of new issues. Should ancestral remains be reburied? If so, where? And how? Communities may not have appropriate ceremonies for re-burials, and in countries like Australia, in which Indigenous peoples have been forcibly removed from their traditional lands, communities encounter additional barriers. What should be done when connections to Country have been disrupted, or when traditional land has been developed, disturbed or eroded? How can the future protection of repatriated remains and artefacts be ensured? Such discussions can be fraught and protracted, placing a heavy burden on traditional owners. Dr Amber Aranui discussed similar issues in her work as a Curator, Repatriation Researcher and Archaeologist at Te Papa Tongarewa, the National Museum of New Zealand. Amber reflected on the unique position she occupies as a Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Tūwharetoa descendent, and an employee of a colonial institution that enacted violence and dispossession on her people. While this allows her to bring an important Māori perspective to national repatriation initiatives, it also creates a tension that has forced her to inhabit difficult ethical situations. New Zealand has an interesting history of repatriation. While claims for repatriation were made as far back as the 1940s, it wasn’t until the 1980s that New Zealand museums became more involved. Even then, Amber argued, repatriation efforts typically involved international museums returning taonga (objects of cultural significance), rather than New Zealand’s own institutions repatriating taonga and ancestral remains to iwi (tribal group). For Amber, this raises further questions about museum collection practices, the role of cultural heritage in education, and the idea of national ‘ownership’ of artefacts versus international trafficking. Amber argued repatriation is crucial to reconciliation efforts. Her own work has been instrumental in helping build support for repatriation initiatives in New Zealand; support she claimed is increasing. Most recently, in June 2021, Museums Aoteroa adopted a National Repatriation Policy for Kōiwi Tangata and Associated Burial Taonga within Aotearoa. Prepared by the National Repatriation Network, of which Amber is a founding member and former chair, the policy offers guidance for museums in taking an ethical approach to the respectful management of kōiwi tangata (human remains) within their care, with a presumption that repatriation to the source community should be the outcome wherever possible. Still, Amber argued, many efforts still remain reactive. Museums and other research institutions must be more proactive in their approach to and pursuit of repatriation. Dr Maria Nugent saw repatriation initiatives serving a similar purpose in Australia. A specialist in analysing modes of telling history and making memory in cultural heritage, community and museum contexts, Maria argued that repatriation is an important part of the broader project of recasting Australian history. This project, of course, is always filled with contestation over which pasts can and should be drawn into the present. Maria discussed her recent repatriation work with the Aboriginal communities of La Peruse, which focuses on material culture objects held in museum collections. The material culture of Port Jackson Aboriginal communities was once the most internationally well-known. Yet now, Maria argued, it is the least, having been scattered throughout archives across the imperial world. Provenance again emerged as a key issue for researchers, as did the accessibility of historical records for Aboriginal people. Assisting Aboriginal people in obtaining their own information from incomplete or inadequate records is a challenge many institutions are yet to overcome. At the same time, Maria argued, bureaucracy is a space in which good work can sometimes happen: pulling together lengthy reports and filling out institutional paperwork requires deep thinking and careful planning in consultation with traditional owners. Maria described a sense among her team that they were leveraging an important moment in time. There has been a global shift towards repatriation efforts, and the current interest, support and funding given to her project drives Maria’s desire to work quickly and efficiently lest that moment begin to fade. Communities often bring memories of failed attempts and past hurts to repatriation initiatives, something that must be appreciated and understood by institutions and researchers. Indeed, Maria described her project as one that consciously does not assume repatriation to be the end goal. Repatriation in its true sense means a permanent return, but Maria argued it is also crucial to see repatriation as being part of broader repair and recovery work, such as truth telling and reconciliation. Repair might even be considered as an end in and of itself. The most important thing, however, is for institutions and repatriation researchers to ask traditional owners what they want, how they feel, what they think, and then, Maria stressed, to listen. Similar sentiments drive the work of Dr Michael Pickering, a senior curatorial fellow at the National Museum of Australia who works closely with local Aboriginal groups in the Museum’s repatriation efforts. Michael reiterated Amber’s call that museums need to be proactive in pursuing repatriation. One way they can achieve this, he argued, is by funding dedicated provenance research teams. Yet there are few, if any, places in Australia where you can go to study these particular research skills, and a dearth of courses on repatriation in general. There is often a tension between museums and universities when it comes to repatriation, both in the skills and training on offer and their overall relationship to cultural artefacts in their collections. Michael argued there is little formal institutional exchange of information on what objects or ancestral remains are being held, which then hinders proactive discussions on what to do with them. University collections, especially those of university museums, can pose particular issues. Items may remain hidden or forgotten in the collections of individual academics or research projects, only coming to light through retirement or a major archival clean-up. Michael argued passionately for the leading role Australian universities can take in the repatriation movement, both through education and by modelling an honest, open approach to assessing archives. Institutions may fear that returning materials will lead to a ‘loss’ of knowledge or data, but Michael argued repatriation frequently leads to the production of greater and deeper knowledge. Repatriation should be seen as a way of doing history; by working with traditional owners, interrogating past practices, and reshaping methodologies, new relationships, questions and answers arise. Michael briefly mentioned anti-repatriation advocates, who sometimes raise valid questions of what will happen to materials once they are returned, but he believed Australian institutions are in a unique position to lead and shape the discussion and practice of repatriation in conjunction with Aboriginal communities. Repatriation is coming, whether institutions agree with it or not. So they better get ready. Overall, our speakers presented repatriation as a fraught and complex process. It is rarely smooth or easy for participants to negotiate, but it is necessary and oftentimes positive in its outcomes. The strongest repatriation processes are those that are led by the voices and desires of traditional owners, while also acknowledging the emotional and administrative burden this places on communities. Institutions, both public and private, can assist with thorough provenance research, open communication, and shifting perspectives to recognise repatriation not as a loss of knowledge, but a chance for new engagements with history and memory.
  • Free online event: Yarning & Art: Cultural Wellness and Caring for Mob in the Museum

    5th May, 2022

    The First Nations Speaker Series is presented in collaboration with GML Heritage and the Research Centre for Deep History. Join us for a conversation with Dr Virginia Keft about cultural wellness and caring for Mob in the Museum. What: Yarning & Art: Cultural Wellness and Caring for Mob in the Museum with Dr Virginia Keft When: Thursday 5 May 2022, 6pm–7pm Where: Free Online Event. The session will be recorded and made available after the event. Register: Bookings are required, [register for your free ticket here](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/events/yarning-art-cultural-wellness-and-caring-mob-museum). Dementia is nationally recognised as one of the largest growing health concerns across the population in Australia. Research has shown that dementia prevalence amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is almost five times higher than that of the general population. Dr Virginia Keft identifies a major gap in the availability of services that provide culturally appropriate and informed creative and social programs to better engage and support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia and their families. Specifically, she discusses the significant role that art and art making may play in supporting positive connections of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to culture, Country, kinship, knowledge systems and beliefs. Art Yarns: For Older and Elder Mob, is a culturally responsive contemporary art program established by Dr Keft and delivered through the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia. The initiative is entirely Aboriginal designed, implemented, and delivered. Art Yarns proposes to provide positive art experiences for older people in an informal shared social environment. The program fosters the notion that intergenerational exchange is integral to bolstering strong connections to cultural identity. The program hopes to contribute to filling the considerable gap in current well-being services available to those living with dementia in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander urban Community. **About Dr Virginia Keft** Dr Virginia Keft is a proud Muruwari Woman; First Nations Producer, a practicing artist, curator, and award-winning researcher with over 25 years’ experience working in the Arts Sector. Virginia has produced and curated artistic and cultural programs that celebrate and recognise the continuity of Culture and the important contribution that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have made, and continue to make, to the Arts, education, community, and care of Country. Read more. [Register for this free event here](https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/events/yarning-art-cultural-wellness-and-caring-mob-museum). Attendees will be sent a link to the Zoom meeting after registering.
  • Celebrating the launch of the Routledge Companion to Global Indigenous History

    4th May, 2022

    In March 2022, editors Ann McGrath and Lynette Russell hosted local, national and international guests at the launch of important new publication The Routledge Companion to Global Indigenous History. The event was emceed by Mark Kenny from the Australian Studies Institute who facilitated a conversation with Ann and Lynette as well as presentations by contributors Ben Silverstein, Kate Fullagar, Laura Rademaker, and Chris Ballard. Following a stimulating reflection on the publication and its themes, The Routledge Companion to Global Indigenous History was officially launched by Jackie Huggins. Catch up on the discussion and event in the video below: Celebrating the launch of the Routledge Companion to Global Indigenous History. The Routledge Companion to Global Indigenous History presents exciting innovations in the dynamic field of Indigenous global history while also outlining ethical, political, and practical research. The book features contributors, both Indigenous and settler, across several geographical locations, including Africa, Asia, Australia, Northern Europe and the Americas, who illustrate the important role of Indigenous history and Indigenous knowledges for contemporary concerns, including climate change, spirituality and religious movements, gender negotiations, modernity and mobility, and reflections on the meaning of ‘nation’ and ‘global’. Showcasing the state of the art in Indigenous global history, the contributors suggest exciting new directions in the field, examine its many research challenges and show its resonances for a global politics of the present and future. ![Companion_to_Indigenous_History_Book_Launch_-_Med_Res_-_Shot_By_Creswick_Collective_(100_of_103).jpg](/uploads/Companion_to_Indigenous_History_Book_Launch_Med_Res_Shot_By_Creswick_Collective_100_of_103_5b98449563.jpg) Purchase a physical copy or ebook from Routledge: https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Companion-to-Global-Indigenous-History/McGrath-Russell/p/book/9781138743106 Photographs: Liam Budge, Creswick Collective
  • Anita Heiss in conversation with Ann McGrath

    29th April, 2022

    As part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series, Centre Director Ann McGrath facilitated a conversation with Anita Heiss on Tuesday 26th April, 2022 about Anita's new book, Am I Black Enough For You? 10 Years On which tells the story of an urban-based high achieving Wiradyuri woman working to break down stereotypes and build bridges between black and white Australia. Anita, a successful author and passionate advocate for Aboriginal literacy, rights and representation, was born a member of the Wiradyuri nation of central New South Wales. Raised in the suburbs of Sydney, she was educated at the local Catholic school. In her book, she explores what it means to be Aboriginal and why Australia is so obsessed with notions of identity. Anita Heiss is one of Australia's best known authors, publishing across genres including non-fiction, historical fiction, commercial fiction and children's fiction. Anita's non-fiction works include Am I Black Enough for You?, Dhuuluu-Yala (To Talk Straight): Publishing Aboriginal Literature, and, as editor, Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia and The Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature, which she co-edited with Peter Minter. Her novel Barbed Wire and Cherry Blossoms was shortlisted for the Queensland Literary Awards and longlisted for the Dublin International Literary Prize, and was the University of Canberra 2020 Book of the Year. Anita's children's literature includes Kicking Goals with Goodesy and Magic, co-written with Adam Goodes and Michael O'Loughlin. Internationally, she has performed her work and lectured on Aboriginal literature at universities and conferences, consulates and embassies in the USA, Canada, the UK, Tahiti, Fiji, New Caledonia, Spain, Japan, Austria, Germany, China, India and New Zealand. Anita is a Lifetime Ambassador for the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, a Professor of Communications at the University of Queensland and is on the board of the National Justice Project, University of Queensland Press, Aboriginal Art Co and Circa Contemporary Theatre. Anita loves chocolate, running and being a creative disruptor. ‘It was such a privilege to reconnect with Anita, who I first met as a student at the University of New South Wales, where she undertook her final honours year in 1991. Her lifetime achievements are so inspiring; she makes a real impact as a public figure, as a role model for urban Aboriginal women, as an author and educator. ‘Am I black enough for you?’ is a huge question, one that should never have to be asked. Our nation needs to take up Anita’s call for Truth Telling. Her honesty in writing and talking about her own story should be emulated when we talk and write about Australian history.’ ‘I’m grateful for the opportunity to be back on Ngunnawal country and at the ANU to discuss my memoir. My hope is my story speaks to the hearts and minds of those seeking to understand the rights we have as First Nations peoples to assert and live the diversity of our identities. I firmly believe that storytelling and story listening can bring people together, my in conversation with Ann, decades after she taught me at UNSW, was the perfect example of that. Mandaang guwu (thank you) to all who came along and engaged with the discussion and the themes, and I look forward to doing more with the ANU in the future.’ Stream episode In conversation with Anita Heiss by Experience ANU podcast | [Listen online for free on SoundCloud](https://soundcloud.com/experience_anu/in-conversation-with-anita-heiss?utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing). Get your autographed copy from [Booktopia](https://www.booktopia.com.au/am-i-black-enough-for-you--anita-heiss/book/9781761046162.html) or on campus (or online) at [Harry Hartog Books](https://www.harryhartog.com.au/new-books/am-i-black-enough-for-you/9781761046162/buy-online). ![Anita_Heiss.jpg](/uploads/Anita_Heiss_2f8ea5b10f.jpg)
  • Catch up: Kurrwa1 to Kartak2: hand–made/held–ground with Professor Brenda L Croft

    28th April, 2022

    How can notions of home, community, and Country be represented within histories of both endurance and dislocation? In March 2022, Brenda L. Croft gave a talk as part of The First Nations Speaker Series presented in collaboration with [GML Heritage](https://www.gml.com.au/news/first-nations-speaker-series) and the Research Centre for Deep History. Brenda presented a Gurindji-specific historiography that engaged with the pastoral impact on Gurindji Country from the late nineteenth century, the experience of Stolen Generations members and their descendants, and contemporary Gurindji experience into the 21st century. These are themes represented at ‘Still in my mind: Gurindji location, experience and visuality’, a national touring exhibition Brenda has collaboratively curated with Gurindji family and community members, reflecting on events preceding and following the 1966 Walk-Off at Wave Hill Station that sparked the national land rights movement. This work presents an enduring, collaborative practice–led research journey representing a distinct Australian First Nations Storying/Storywork and First Nations Performative Autoethnography as subalter/N/ative archive and methodology – created from the rememorying, re/imagined standpoint of a Gurindji | Malngin | Mudburra | Anglo-Australian | Chinese | German | Irish woman. Catch up on Brenda’s presentation in the video below. **About Brenda L Croft** Professor Brenda L Croft is from the Gurindji/Malngin/Mudburra Peoples from the Victoria River region of the Northern Territory of Australia, and Anglo-Australian/ Chinese/German/Irish heritage. She has been involved in the Australian First Nations and broader contemporary arts and cultural sectors as a multi-disciplinary creative practitioner since the mid-1980s as an artist, consultant, curator, educator and researcher. She has received numerous regional, national and international awards, fellowships and residencies throughout her professional practice, and is extensively published nationally and internationally. *Kurrwa (stone tool/axe head); to listen to Gurindji pronunciation, click on link, then letter, then scroll down to the word and click on speaker icon, http://ausil.org/Dictionary/Gurindji/lexicon/index.htm; see also p. 37, https://www.cdu.edu.au/sites/default/files/artcollection–gallery/docs/simm–teachers–notes.pdf. NB – all Gurindji language words in this exegesis are from this source. **Kartak (container, cup, billycan, pannikin), ibid; see also p. 38, https://www.cdu.edu.au/sites/default/files/artcollection–gallery/docs/simm–teachers–notes.pdf.
  • Down There with Peter Read: A Celebration of four decades of history-making

    on the 8th April, 2022

    This is a celebration of Peter Read’s wide-ranging and continuing contribution to history-making. What: Panel Talk event When: 9.30am - 6pm, Friday 8 April Where: RSSS Auditorium, Level 1, 146 Ellery Crescent Acton, ACT 2601 Register: This is a free event, but bookings are essential. [Register to attend here]( https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/down-there-with-peter-read-a-celebration-of-four-decades-of-history-making-tickets-274485462407). Much of Peter Read’s career has been spent ‘down there’ – sitting on the ground listening to stories, interviewing people in their homes and digging into the past. His research on the Stolen Generations profoundly changed the face of Australian history, shaping a new national story that continues to challenge and inform politics and history-making. But there are many other strings to Peter Read’s history-making bow. After more than four decades, the time has come to celebrate Peter Read’s wide-ranging and continuing contribution to history-making. This one-day event, to be held at The Australian National University on Friday 8 April, will explore various aspects of Peter’s work, from his social history of the Northern Territory in the late 1970s, through his work on Chile, to his most recent work on Aboriginal Sydney. Speakers include Ann McGrath, Jay Arthur, Jackie Huggins, Shauna Bostock-Smith, Marivic Wyndham, Heather Goodall, Nick Brown, Rani Kerin, Rosanne Kennedy, Julie Janson, Julia Hurst among others. The day will conclude with closing remarks from Peter followed by a short reception. Enquiries: Dr Rani Kerin - rani.kerin@gmail.com. Places are limited. [Register here](https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/down-there-with-peter-read-a-celebration-of-four-decades-of-history-making-tickets-274485462407).
  • Deep Conversations: Restoration, Recovery and Repair

    5th April, 2022

    In Part I of this deep conversation, we reflect on the practice, meaning and significance of repatriation, and its role in the reconciliation processes of institutions, nations, histories, and environments.   Date: Tuesday 5 April 2022 Time: 12:00-1:30pm Location: Room 4.69, Level 4, RSSS Building, 146 Ellery Crescent, ANU Register: This is a free event, but bookings are essential. [Register to attend here](https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/deep-conversations-restoration-recovery-and-repair-tickets-304441752477). **Part I: Repatriation** Amid a climate of crisis and ‘unprecedented times’, moments of destruction and devastation are intertwined with those of respite and renewal. By exploring these moments—their mechanisms and tensions—scholars can produce new insights into our past, present and potential futures.   Deep Conversations: History, Environment, Science series is a partnership of the Research Centre for Deep History and the Centre for Environmental History. It aims to bring together scholars from diverse disciplines to discuss questions of history, science and the environment, and how they shed light on the global challenges we face today.   Speakers: Dr Maria Nugent (Australian National University), Dr Hilary Howes (Australian National University), Dr Amber Aranui (Victoria University Wellington), and Dr Michael Pickering (National Museum of Australia). This will be a hybrid event and will take place in person and via Zoom. Contact: Dr Amy Way - amy.way@anu.edu.au [Register here](https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/deep-conversations-restoration-recovery-and-repair-tickets-304441752477).